MV Hospital

Welcome to M.V Hospital for Diabetes, established by late Prof. M.Viswanathan, Doyen of Diabetology in India in 1954 as a general hospital. In 1971 it became a hospital exclusively for Diabetes care. It has, at present,100 beds for the treatment of diabetes and its complications.

Monday, February 20, 2017

Protect foot from ulcers

Foot ulcers are one of the most common of diabetic complications and one of the leading causes of
amputations.

A device approved by the NHS can prevent foot ulcers. It is a thin liquid gel insert in the shoe which
changes the distribution of body weight as excessive pressure on the feet is one of the causes of foot
damage. It also massages muscles on the sole of the foot and increases blood circulation.

Another patented device approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration can predict whether
an ulcer will develop more than a month before it actually shows up. Foot ulcers are not easy to
recognize or diagnose while they are developing.

However, they do show some early warning signs. The place where an ulcer is likely to appear will be
a warmer spot on your foot. The device uses temperature data to predict whether an ulcer will develop which gives doctors more time to treat it. It is based on a study by Doctor of Podiatric Medicine, Robert G Fryberg, which investigated whether heat sensing mats at home could help detect foot ulcers early and help prevent them.

The device is a wireless monitoring system that collects foot temperature scans . Using the device is
simple. ‘People have to keep it turned on and step on it  each morning. Data from the thermogram of
the feet is sent to a central server. A difference of  four or more degrees Fahrenheit on two successive
days will register an alert, which is then transmitted to the user and to his or her doctor for necessary
treatment’.

A company, Podimetrics makes and manages this system.

Monday, January 30, 2017

What to Expect at Your Annual Foot Check

                                                                                                                                           SeenaRajsekar
                                                                                                                                           Bamila S
                                                                                                                                           Podiatry

Whether you have Type 1 diabetes or Type 2 diabetes, you are at risk for foot problems. Getting your feet checked regularly is a must.

When your diabetologist/ podiatrist checks your feet…

1. Theblood circulation(bloodvessels),sensation (nerves) and pressure to the plantar region of the lower limbs   will be checked.
2. You will be asked to remove your footwear.
3. Your feet will be examined for corns, calluses, nail pathology and changes in colour and shape or for any existing problem.
4. Your foot wear will be examined to see if they are appropriate and if they are causing any problems.
5. You will be given advice for your foot.


Inform your doctor 

…if you noticed any swelling, warmth, discoloration,cuts, corns, blisters or broken skin
…if you had any previous wound
…if you have any pain or discomfort
…if you feel cramp- like pain while walking, burning, prickling, tingling sensations  orhave any problems in managing diabetes.

Monday, January 23, 2017

Take Care of Your Kidneys:

Kidney damage can happen to anyone, but people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes are more prone.So, reduce your risk as  part of diabetes management.

1. Do not miss any medical appointment.
2.Keep blood pressure, cholesterol  and blood sugar in check . If your numbers are not good, take action and get them to the target range.
3. Test urine for protein and get a blood test for kidney function at least once a year.
4. Stop smoking ---if you do.
5. Eat a healthy balanced diet that is low in fat, salt and sugar with lots of fruit and vegetables.
6. Keep active with gardening or walking.

Monday, January 16, 2017

Health Hazards in Food

 

 The International Agency for Research on cancer (IARC), a specialized cancer agency for the WHO has classified processed meats as ‘definite’ cause of cancer and redmeats as ‘probable’ cause.

Red meat is any meat that is dark red in colour before it is cooked  such as  beef, lamb and  pork  and processed meat is meat such as  bacon , sausage, hot dogs, ham, salami and peperoni that has been cured, salted, smoked or otherwise preserved. Both these are differentfrom chicken, turkey and fish that are classified as white meats.

How does processed meat cause cancer?

It is not the quality of the meat or where it is bought from. Evidence suggests it is probablythe processing of the meat orchemicals naturally present in it that increases the cancer risk, and the main culprits seem to be the chemicals found in the meat itself. Processed red meats contain chemicals such as nitrite preservatives that generate certain compounds in the gut that can cause cancer. Cooking meat at high temperatures- grilling and barbecuing,  can also create chemicals in the meat that may increase the risk of cancer. These chemicals are generally produced in higher levels in red and processed meats when compared to other meats.

Other research suggests iron in red meats could play a part and gut bacteria might play a supporting role.

How much should we eat?


Red meat is a good source of some nutrients such as protein, iron, zinc, and vitamin B12. So how much should we include in the diet? The risk of cancer is lower the less you eat so cut down on the amount of red meats and try to avoid processed meats. People who eat more than cooked weight 90 g of red meat should cut down to 70 g or less.

How?


   
 
Eat small and fewer portions. Add more vegetable , beans, and  pulses to the  meal. Choose chicken / fish instead. For people with diabetes, try to eat a healthy balanced meal with plenty of fibre, fruit and vegetables . Cut back on red processed meats and salt.We recommend that people with diabetes  should limit consumption of red meat to about twice a month.

Tip of the Week

Tip of the Week
Choose the right shoe and socks